TovmasyanMD

Doctor of medicine, young, purposeful, ambitious, delicate, never stop thinking.

Gabriel García Márquez Dies At 87

R.I.P. Gabriel..
“What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.” 

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

(via biomedicalephemera)

thenouxnoux:

poppyclub:

The mass murder of Armenians, my people, is occuring right now in Kessab, an area in Syria. Turkish, Syrian, and many Islamic rebel groups affiliated with Al-Qaeda are currently demolishing their churches, homes, and cutting of their heads, raping the women, etc.
Most of you do not know, but this exact thing occurred 100 years ago, in 1915.
The is the Armenian Genocide, all over again.
Please spread the word and #SAVEKESSAB 

If you think that sitting at home and posting photos won’t actually help people at Kessab, you’re somehow right. But as I can’t take the plane and go help people in that area, I prefer to spread the word, so that everyone will be aware of what’s going on. It’s a crime against humanity.

thenouxnoux:

poppyclub:

The mass murder of Armenians, my people, is occuring right now in Kessab, an area in Syria. Turkish, Syrian, and many Islamic rebel groups affiliated with Al-Qaeda are currently demolishing their churches, homes, and cutting of their heads, raping the women, etc.

Most of you do not know, but this exact thing occurred 100 years ago, in 1915.

The is the Armenian Genocide, all over again.

Please spread the word and #SAVEKESSAB 

If you think that sitting at home and posting photos won’t actually help people at Kessab, you’re somehow right. But as I can’t take the plane and go help people in that area, I prefer to spread the word, so that everyone will be aware of what’s going on. It’s a crime against humanity.

(via unform14)

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar
If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.
Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.
Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.
Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar

If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.

Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.

Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.

Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

(Source: thenudediet)

wonderful weekend ^_^

Aram MP3 - Not Alone (Armenia) 2014 Eurovision Song Contest

armenianhighland:

Armenias eurovision entry! ALMOST ONE MILLION VIEWS! guys make sure to vote for Aram MP3 and click that like button on the video!

bye exams, it’s time for changes! then I just cut it off ^_^

nursingisinmyblood:

idledancer:

House

Always a good one!

(Source: nenyc, via uaortho)